The California citrus industry is facing its biggest threat yet – the Asian citrus psyllid and the disease it can carry, Huanglongbing, also known as HLB or citrus greening disease. Citrus Insider is your hub for industry-specific information. We encourage you to survey and treat for the pest, be on the lookout for the disease and stay informed.

For Tulare County Psyllid Management Area information, click here.

The Latest:

ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID QUARANTINE EXPANSION IN KERN COUNTY

SACRAMENTO, October 21, 2014 – An additional portion of Kern County has been placed under quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) following the detection of one psyllid south of the City of Bakersfield in Kern County.

The new quarantine zone measures 148-square miles in and around the City of Bakersfield, bordering on the north by New Stine Road; on the east by S Vineland Road; on the south by Millux Road; and on the west by Interstate 5. This area is in addition to the previously announced quarantine areas in Kern County. A map is available online at: www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/go/acp-quarantine.

In addition to quarantines in portions of Kern, Fresno, and San Luis Obispo counties, ACP entire-county quarantines remain in place in Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Tulare, and Ventura counties.

The ACP is an invasive species of grave concern because it can carry the disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening. All citrus and closely related species are susceptible hosts for both the insect and the disease. There is no cure once a tree becomes infected. The diseased tree will decline in health until it dies. HLB has been detected just once in California – in 2012 on a single residential property in Hacienda Heights, Los Angeles County. HLB is known to be present in Mexico and in parts of the southern U.S. Florida first detected the psyllid in 1998 and he disease in 2005, and the two have been detected in all 30 citrus-producing counties in that state. The University of Florida estimates that the disease is responsible for the loss of more than 6,600 lost jobs, $1.3 billion in lost revenue to growers and $3.6 billion in lost economic activity. The disease is present in Georgia, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Texas. The states of Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii, and Mississippi have detected the pest but not the disease.

Residents in the area who think they may have seen ACP or symptoms of HLB on their citrus tree are urged to call CDFA’s Pest Hotline at 1-800-491-1899. For more information on the ACP and HLB, please visit: www.cdfa.ca.gov/go/acp.

Lodi/Manteca Asian Citrus Psyllid Finds

The following press release was distributed Oct. 13, 2014 by the San Joaquin County Agricultural Commissioner’s Office. Additional details will be shared when available.

ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLIDS DETECTED IN MANTECA / LODI, SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY

STOCKTON, CA, October 13, 2014 – The San Joaquin County Agricultural Commissioner, in cooperation with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), is beginning an extensive survey in response to the first detection of two Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) in the county; one in the City of Manteca and one in the City of Lodi.
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Information Regarding the Tulare County Quarantine Expansion

Recently the California Department of Food and Agriculture placed all of Tulare County under quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid. To help clarify what this means for citrus industry professionals in the region, please review the following information:

All of Tulare County has been placed under quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) following the detection of two psyllids in the City of Tulare. The first ACP was detected in a trap in a residential neighborhood on September 10, in the City of Tulare. The second detection was on September 17, also in a residential setting within the City of Tulare. These detections, when added to previous detections elsewhere in the county, dictate that a county-wide quarantine is the most effective response to contain the pest.

What does the established county-wide quarantine mean for the movement of bulk citrus?
Tulare County growers may now move bulk citrus freely within the county. Growers wishing to move bulk citrus from the quarantine area to locations outside of the quarantine for packing are still required to meet the ACP-Free Compliance Standards. For more information on requirements for moving citrus from within the quarantine to a non-contiguous quarantine or non-quarantine area, please visit the California Department of Food and Agriculture website at www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/acp.

What does this mean for the movement of citrus nursery stock?
Tulare County nurseries may move citrus nursery stock within the quarantine area if it is treated following the treatment protocol and tagged to restrict movement outside of the quarantine. Nursery stock grown from certified clean stock, within USDA approved insect resistant structures with inspections and treatment following the treatment protocol may be moved out of the quarantine area under certificate. Questions regarding nursery quarantine requirements should be directed to the Visalia ACP Project at (559) 636-7410.

What does this mean for ACP treatments in Tulare County?
CDFA, in cooperation with the Tulare County Agricultural Commissioner’s Office, will continue to administer the ACP detection and treatment program within Tulare County. This includes surveying for ACP and symptoms of Huanglongbing disease, trapping for ACP with confirmed detections triggering treatments within 800 meters of a find site.

Northern California ACP Detection

The following press release was issued by the Santa Clara County Agricultural Commissioner Friday, Oct. 10, 2014. Additional details related to next steps will come in the near future.

ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID DETECTED IN SAN JOSE
First Detection of Insect in Santa Clara County

SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIF.–The Santa Clara County Agricultural Commissioner, in cooperation with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), is beginning an extensive survey in response to the detection of Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) in the City of San Jose near Kelly Park. This is the first detection of ACP in Santa Clara County and the Bay Area.

The ACP were detected in a residential neighborhood near Phelan Avenue and Roberts Avenue in San Jose. Treatment activities will be carried out on all citrus plants surrounding the sites where the insects were trapped. Residents in the treatment area will be notified in advance of any activity. Additionally, an increased number of traps have been deployed and a visual survey is ongoing on the surrounding properties in an attempt to determine if there is an infestation.
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Ventura ACP Update from Grower Liaison Joanne O’Sullivan

While much of September experienced a break in the number of commercial groves involved in Asian citrus psyllid detections, a jump in activity has occurred recently with more detections coming from traps located in commercial groves.

Ojai experienced its first commercial detection and I am working closely with the local growers to organize treatments. I want to thank the growers in the region for working so well together.

The usual fall grove treatments that take place during this time of year have created a larger challenge to get ACP treatments scheduled, but be assured, treatments are taking place.

Also, since the Asian citrus psyllid quarantine stretches from northern Santa Barbara County to the Mexican border, there’s no requirement that the fruit be cleaned or the loads be covered as it moves within that area. Requiring the loads be tarped is a voluntary measure that some packinghouses are taking to limit the spread of ACP into Ventura County.

Psyllids cannot survive the wash process the fruit goes through when it gets to the packinghouse, and the California Department of Food and Agriculture has delimitation-style traps surrounding the packinghouses to monitor whether ACP are escaping into neighborhoods.

Continue to stay vigilant and work together to keep ACP detections down. Thank you for your hard work.

CDFA ANNOUNCES VACANCY ON CITRUS PEST AND DISEASE PREVENTION COMMITTEE

The following is a press release issued by the California Department of Food and Agriculture on Sept. 26, 2014.

SACRAMENTO, September 26, 2014 – The California Department of Food and Agriculture is announcing one vacancy on the Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Committee. The Committee advises the CDFA secretary on activities associated with the statewide citrus specific pest and disease work plan that includes, but is not limited to outreach and education programs and programs for surveying, detecting, analyzing, and treating pests and diseases specific to citrus.

The members receive no compensation, but are entitled to payment of necessary travel expenses in accordance with the rules of the Department of Personnel Administration.

A committee member vacancy exists for a grower representative from Tulare County and will expire on September 30, 2017. Applicants should have an interest in agriculture and citrus pest and disease prevention. Individuals interested in being considered for a committee appointment should send a brief resume by November 1, 2014 to the California Department of Food and Agriculture, Plant Health and Pest Prevention Services, 1220 N Street, Room 221, Sacramento, California 95814, Attention: Victoria Hornbaker.

For additional information, contact: Victoria Hornbaker, Program Manager at (916) 654-0317, or e-mail (Victoria.hornbaker@cdfa.ca.gov).

ALL OF TULARE COUNTY ADDED TO ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID QUARANTINE

The following is a press release issued by the California Department of Food and Agriculture on Sept. 26, 2014. Check CitrusInsider.org regularly and stay in contact with your regional grower liaison for updates.

SACRAMENTO, September 26, 2014 – All of Tulare County has been placed under quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) following the detection of two psyllids in the City of Tulare. The first ACP was detected in a trap in a residential neighborhood on September 10, in the City of Tulare. The second detection was on September 17, also in a residential setting within the City of Tulare. These detections, when added to previous detections elsewhere in the county, dictate that a county-wide quarantine is the most effective response to contain the pest. A map is available online at: www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/go/acp-quarantine

The quarantine prohibits the movement of host nursery stock out of the quarantine area and requires that all citrus fruit be either cleaned of leaves and stems or treated in a manner to eliminate ACP prior to moving out of the quarantine area. Residents with backyard citrus trees in the quarantine area are asked to not remove fruit from the quarantine area.

In addition to quarantines in portions of Fresno, Kern, and San Luis Obispo counties, ACP entire-county quarantines remain in place in Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties.

The ACP is an invasive species of grave concern because it can carry the disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening. All citrus and closely related species are susceptible hosts for both the insect and the disease. There is no cure once a tree becomes infected. The diseased tree will decline in health until it dies.

HLB has been detected just once in California – in 2012 on a single residential property in Hacienda Heights, Los Angeles County. HLB is known to be present in Mexico and in parts of the southern U.S. Florida first detected the psyllid in 1998 and the disease in 2005, and the two have been detected in all 30 citrus-producing counties in that state. The University of Florida estimates the disease has tallied more than 6,600 lost jobs, $1.3 billion in lost revenue to growers and $3.6 billion in lost economic activity. The disease is present in Georgia, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Texas. The states of Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii, and Mississippi have detected the pest but not the disease.

Residents in the area who think they may have seen the Asian citrus psyllid are urged to call CDFA’s Pest Hotline at 1-800-491-1899. For more information on the Asian citrus psyllid and huanglongbing disease, please visit: www.cdfa.ca.gov/go/acp.

Asian Citrus Psyllid Quarantine Expansion in Kern County

The following is a press release issued by the California Department of Food and Agriculture on Sept. 18, 2014. Check CitrusInsider.org regularly and stay in contact with your regional grower liaison for updates on potential regulatory implications.

SACRAMENTO, September 18, 2014 – An additional portion of Kern County has been placed under quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) following the detection of one psyllid south of the City of Bakersfield in Kern County.

The new quarantine zone measures 113 square miles in and around the City of Bakersfield, bordered on the north by New Stine Road; on the east by S Fairfax Road; on the south by Millux Road; and on the west by Interstate 5. This area is in addition to the previously announced quarantine areas in Kern County. A map is available online at: www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/go/acp-quarantine

In addition to quarantines in portions of Kern, Fresno, San Luis Obispo, and Tulare counties, ACP entire-county quarantines remain in place in Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties.

The ACP is an invasive species of grave concern because it can carry the disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening. All citrus and closely related species are susceptible hosts for both the insect and the disease. There is no cure once a tree becomes infected. The diseased tree will decline in health until it dies. HLB has been detected just once in California – in 2012 on a single residential property in Hacienda Heights, Los Angeles County. HLB is known to be present in Mexico and in parts of the southern U.S. Florida first detected the psyllid in 1998 and the disease in 2005, and the two have been detected in all 30 citrus-producing counties in that state. The University of Florida estimates the disease has tallied more than 6,600 lost jobs, $1.3 billion in lost revenue to growers and $3.6 billion in lost economic activity. The disease is present in Georgia, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Texas. The states of Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii, and Mississippi have detected the pest but not the disease.

Residents in the area who think they may have seen the Asian citrus psyllid are urged to call CDFA’s Pest Hotline at 1-800-491-1899. For more information on the Asian citrus psyllid and huanglongbing disease, please visit: www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/acp.

Asian Citrus Psyllid Detected Near City of Bakersfield, Kern County

The following is a press release issued by the Kern County Agricultural Commissioner’s Office on Sept. 15, 2014. Check CitrusInsider.org regularly and stay in contact with your regional grower liaison for updates on potential regulatory implications.

BAKERSFIELD, September 15, 2014 – The Kern County Agricultural Commissioner, in cooperation with the California Department of Food and Agriculture and the United States Department of Agriculture are beginning an extensive survey and treatment program in response to the detection of one Asian citrus psyllid along Highway 119, close to Pumpkin Center, near the City of Bakersfield in Kern County.

One adult Asian citrus psyllid was confirmed on Thursday, September 5, 2014 along Highway 119, close to Pumpkin Center, near the City of Bakersfield in Kern County. A treatment program will be carried out on all citrus host plants within 800 meters surrounding the site where the insect was trapped. Residents in the treatment area will be notified in advance. Continue reading

Awareness campaign sheds light on Asian citrus psyllid threat

Reaching residents along the Central Coast with important information about the Asian citrus psyllid and the potential threat of Huanglongbing is a key function of the Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program. Recently, the program launched an awareness campaign covering the Central Coast region, including San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura and more.

The many outreach strategies implemented in the area include advertising on key English and Spanish radio stations, as well as print advertising in the San Luis Obispo Tribune, Ventura County Star, Santa Barbara Independent and a variety of weekly community papers along the coast. Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program representatives recently visited the popular San Luis Obispo farmers market to reach residents with information about the pest and what they can do to help combat its impact on the citrus industry. Additionally, a media relations campaign is underway to help spread the word and gain support for the program and its efforts.

This educational campaign comes at a time when heightened awareness in the region is critical with the recent Asian citrus psyllid finds in San Luis Obispo County. The Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention program, in collaboration with the California Department of Food and Agriculture and the San Luis Obispo Agricultural Commissioner’s office, will continue to educate residents on the threat and encourage cooperation with eradication efforts.

Update on recent ACP activity in San Luis Obispo County: August-September 2014

In early August an adult Asian citrus psyllid was found on a trap in downtown San Luis Obispo. In the high density trapping and visual surveys conducted in the area in response to this detection, another adult was trapped and immature psyllids were found on three additional properties – signaling a breeding population of the pest is present in the area.

The 800 meter treatment area designated around the initial detection does not include any commercial citrus, only residential properties and approximately five to 10 trees on the Cal Poly San Luis Obispo campus. Similarly, the five-mile quarantine established around the SLO find does not affect any commercial growers except for Cal Poly. The Agricultural Commissioner’s office and California Department of Food and Agriculture staff have met with Cal Poly grove managers and they are fully compliant with both treatment and quarantine regulations.

Shortly after the initial SLO detection, an adult psyllid was found on a trap in Cayucos. No other psyllids have been found in the area during the follow-up delineation trapping and visual surveys. The 800-meter treatment area in Cayucos includes only residential properties. One property within the treatment zone has more than 25 landscape citrus trees so treatment is the responsibility of the property owner. The owner has been contacted and will be treating as soon as possible. A five-mile quarantine zone has been established in the Cayucos area, affecting approximately seven commercial growers, all of whom have been contacted by the Agricultural Commissioner and CDFA and are in full compliance.

For both the SLO and Cayucos detections, CDFA staff is currently treating residential citrus within the treatment areas. Cooperation from residents has been very good, with a low percentage of refusals so far, mostly related to pesticide sensitivity.

At the same time agricultural officials and affected growers have been responding to these recent ACP detections, the effort to inform the general public in the Central Coast about the threat of ACP and HLB has been ramped up, including a local TV and radio advertising campaign, and outreach at the local farmers’ market (learn more about outreach efforts in the accompanying article below).
What you can do

If regular scouting for ACP is not already part of your pest management practices, now is a great time to start looking at your trees for signs of the pest. Check out pest description and monitoring information for ACP on the University of California’s IPM website.

Another important thing growers can do to help in the fight against ACP is to make sure the Citrus Research Board (CRB) mapping project has your current orchard information. Rick Dunn and his team at the CRB are updating information for their citrus mapping layer for San Luis Obispo County, compiling location, acreage and contact information for all commercial citrus plantings throughout the county. This is absolutely essential for rapid communication with growers when a psyllid is detected, and for planning effective and efficient treatment and quarantine areas. It will also be important in the future as the local citrus industry continues to organize itself in response to the changing ACP/HLB landscape. All information collected for the mapping project is held confidential and used only for the purpose of communicating with growers about new ACP/HLB developments.

All growers are encouraged to cooperate with the mapping project if they contact you to verify information. Please also encourage your citrus-growing neighbors to cooperate as well. We’re all in this together and any missing grove information could mean holes in our response and treatment of ACP. If you would like to contact the mapping project directly to ensure they have your current information, please send it to Rick Dunn at the Citrus Research Board (rick@citrusresearch.org or (559) 738-0246).

Staying vigilant and continuing to work together is the only way we can slow ACP down and keep our citrus safe. Keep up the good work!

ACP Quarantine Expansion in San Luis Obispo County

The following is a press release distributed by the California Department of Food and Agriculture Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014. San Luis Obispo County quarantine maps can be viewed on the maps page.

SACRAMENTO, August 27, 2014 – Two areas in San Luis Obispo County have been added to the quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) following the detection of adults and nymphs in and around the City of San Luis Obispo and an adult in the unincorporated area of Cayucos. This brings the total quarantine area in San Luis Obispo County to 268 square miles.

The quarantine area in and around the City of San Luis Obispo measures 97 square miles, bordered on the north by the Los Padres National Forest Boundary; on the east by Burrito Creek; on the south by Davenport Creek Road; and on the west by Hollister Avenue. The quarantine around the unincorporated area of Cayucos measures 61 square miles, bordered on the north by Villa Creek; on the east by the Los Padres National Forest Boundary; on the south by CA State Route 41; and on the west by the Pacific Ocean. The areas described above are in addition to an existing quarantine in the Arroyo Grande area, also in San Luis Obispo County. A map is available online at: www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/go/acp-quarantine
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Asian Citrus Psyllid Scouting Field Trip

To give growers and pest control advisors in the San Joaquin Valley an opportunity to scout for live Asian citrus psyllids, the Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program has organized a field trip taking growers and PCAs from the valley to Riverside County. This free, all-day event takes place Thursday, September 11th and includes guided inspection of infested citrus trees, a working lunch to discuss treatment recommendations and a tour of the Tamarixia rearing facility. The event is free – including transportation and lunch – and 3.5 hours of DPR continuing education credits are available. Register now: http://citrusinsider.org/event-registration/?ee=22

Additional Psyllids Found in SLO

The following is from a press release issued by the San Luis Obispo County Agricultural Commissioner’s Office Monday, Aug. 11, 2014.

San Luis Obispo, CA — High density insect trapping and visual surveys conducted in response to the detection of an adult Asian Citrus Psyllid in a residential neighborhood in San Luis Obispo has resulted in the discovery of additional Asian Citrus Psyllids. Multiple Psyllid life stages were found at three additional properties located approximately one quarter to one third mile from the original site in the north eastern part of the city of San Luis Obispo. Continue reading

Pest Detected in San Luis Obispo

The following press release was issued by the San Luis Obispo County Agricultural Commissioner’s office on Aug. 5, 2014. Additional details regarding potential regulatory implications for industry members will come soon.

San Luis Obispo, CA — The detection of an adult Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP) in an insect trap in a residential neighborhood in northeast San Luis Obispo has prompted a high density trapping delimitation survey of the surrounding area. A quarantine restricting the movement of citrus nursery stock and citrus fruit will be established by the California Department of Food and Agriculture to prevent the spread of this serious plant pest. Control efforts will take place in the near future in the area immediately surrounding the detection.

This is the second detection of ACP in San Luis Obispo County. The first detection occurred this past March in Arroyo Grande; only a single ACP was detected. Intensive trapping and visual surveys are ongoing, but no additional insects have been detected. However, a quarantine restricting the movement of citrus nursery stock and citrus fruit remains in effect in a five-mile radius surrounding the Arroyo Grande detection site.
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Multi-Cultural Outreach in San Francisco

The Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program and U.S. Customs and Border Protection recently collaborated on a press conference to raise awareness of the dangers of bringing citrus fruit and plant material into the country from other areas. The backdrop for the event was the San Francisco International Airport, a hub of global travel in a multi-cultural city where many residents enjoy fresh, homegrown citrus fruit.

Broadcast and print reporters set up at a baggage carousel in San Francisco International Airport to hear from Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program and Customs and Border Protection on the dangers of transporting citrus plant material.

Broadcast and print reporters set up at a baggage carousel in San Francisco International Airport to hear from Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program and Customs and Border Protection on the dangers of transporting citrus plant material.

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Psyllid Management Areas in Tulare County

Developed by the top minds at University of California, California Citrus Mutual and Citrus Research Board, along with other industry leaders, a new area-wide treatment strategy is being introduced to citrus growers to organize the industry and allow for rapid communication if area-wide insecticide treatments are needed.

Coordinated treatments are the most effective way to manage the Asian citrus psyllid and thereby protect our state’s citrus from the incurable Huanglongbing disease, and this new strategy lays the framework for how neighboring growers should synchronize treatments to have the maximum impact on this pest. Right now, Tulare County is still in eradication mode, but the industry should plan for what may come next.
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San Diego County Update from Grower Liaison Enrico Ferro

It has been a busy month for the San Diego County Asian Citrus Psyllid Task Force. We held three meetings to get growers thinking about their fall systemic coordinated treatments, and there were additional finds in the Rancho Santa Fe area – an area that has not had any finds in quite a while.

The meetings were held in Valley Center, Fallbrook and Pauma Valley and were well attended. As a new liaison in the area, the meetings not only helped open up the line of communication between me and the local industry, but they also served as a tool to keep growers informed about the Asian citrus psyllid and how to detect and manage a find. In fact, a grower recently contacted me to say that he could now find the psyllid after attending the meeting.

There are still many growers and homeowners with citrus who are unaware of ACP and HLB. I am now being contacted by people who are just learning about this problem and I will be visiting properties throughout July to make contact with the owners and bring them up to date. This includes properties with abandoned trees, new growers and homeowners with 10-25 trees.

San Joaquin Valley Asian Citrus Psyllid June Update by Grower Liaison Sylvie Robillard

Fresno and Madera Counties
There have not been any trap detections of Asian citrus psyllid in either Fresno or Madera Counties since October of 2013.

Kern County
There has been one find in Kern County at a packing facility in Delano. CDFA has determined that this is a regulatory incident and no treatments are required. Trapping in the area has been increased and all citrus in the immediate area was visually examined for the presence of ACP.

Tulare County
There have three ACP finds in Tulare County, two in the Ivanhoe area and one found south of Farmersville. All commercial groves are in the process of being treated. Backyard trees will be treated by CDFA. Quarantines have been expanded as necessary. Continue reading

Tulare County Quarantine Expansion

As the result of additional psyllid finds in Tulare County, the quarantine has been expanded by 14 square miles. The California Department of Food and Agriculture posted the following press release Thursday, June 19, 2014.

ASIAN CITRUS PSYLLID QUARANTINE EXPANSION IN TULARE COUNTY

SACRAMENTO, June 19, 2014 – An additional portion of Tulare County has been placed under quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) following the detection of one psyllid west of Exeter near the community of Farmersville in Tulare County. This brings the total quarantine area in Tulare County to 870 square miles. Continue reading

News Coverage Raises Awareness of Citrus Program

Raising awareness of the citrus industry’s efforts to combat the Asian citrus psyllid and Huanglongbing in both residential and commercial areas is the first step in earning public support for the program. The Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program has been working on the growers’ behalf to earn positive media placements in leading news sources. Here are highlights of recent coverage. Continue reading

New Grower Liaison Introduced in San Diego County

The Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program introduces Enrico Ferro as the new grower liaison for San Diego County. Ferro graduated from the University of California, Riverside with a Bachelor of Science in Biology. He has worked as an independent pest control advisor (PCA) in the citrus and avocado industry since 1997. He started checking traps, releasing insects and scouting for his father Enrique in 1986. Ferro also has a QAL license and has used biological control to maintain low population levels of several citrus and avocado pests. Ferro also has an organic avocado grove in San Diego County that is planted to high density. He works with small and large growers (both conventional and organic operations) in Riverside and San Diego Counties. Ferro is also director of pest eradication and exclusion for the San Diego Farm Bureau and has been an active participant in the San Diego County Asian Citrus Psyllid Task Force meetings for the past two years.

Ag Net West Radio Interviews Nick Hill

Chairman of the Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Program Nick Hill was recently interviewed by Sabrina Hill with Ag Net West Radio about the importance of halting the spread of the Asian citrus psyllid in the San Joaquin Valley. An important component of the fight against the psyllid is to have harvesters and other citrus industry crews abide by best management practices. Watch the video below or visit http://agnetwest.com/2014/06/09/agnetvideo-nick-hill-on-preventing-asian-citrus-psyllid-spread/ to learn more.

May ACP Update from Joanne O’Sullivan, Ventura County

In May, being the Ventura County Asian citrus psyllid Grower Liaison kept me on my toes for what seemed like the entire month!

In addition to a confirmation in Moorpark that involved 15 properties, there was also a commercial property detection in Camarillo. These two new cases were juggled with the continuing tricky situation at a Fillmore packing house. Continue reading